Last edited by Kanris
Wednesday, October 21, 2020 | History

5 edition of Occult Nodal Metastasis in Solid Carcinomata found in the catalog.

Occult Nodal Metastasis in Solid Carcinomata

Second International Symposium on Cellular Oncology (Cancer Research Monographs)

  • 242 Want to read
  • 25 Currently reading

Published by Praeger Publishers .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Oncology,
  • Cancer,
  • Medical / Nursing,
  • Cancer of unknown primary orig,
  • Cancer of unknown primary origin,
  • Congresses,
  • Lymph nodes,
  • Metastasis,
  • Health/Fitness

  • Edition Notes

    ContributionsMoloy (Editor), Ph.D Garth Nicolson (Editor)
    The Physical Object
    FormatHardcover
    Number of Pages267
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL10288918M
    ISBN 100275926656
    ISBN 109780275926656

    Occult nodal metastasis could theoretically be associated with a subtype of non–small-cell lung cancer that preferentially spreads via regional lymphatics. This is supported by the fact that no association between occult lymph node metastasis and occult bone marrow involvement was . Background. Detection of occult micrometastasis in regional lymph nodes is crucial for diagnosis and selection of appropriate therapy for patients with pN0 nonsmall-cell lung carcinoma. Using immunohistochemical staining, we evaluated the impact of detection of occult micrometastasis on the prevalence and prognosis of patients with lung adenocarcinoma of cm or less in s.

      DOI: /JCO Journal of Clinical Oncology - published online before print PMID: Co-Chairman, Second International Research Symposium on Cellular Oncology, Occult Nodal Metastasis in Solid Carcinomata, Palm Springs, California, Co-Chairman, MDACC Annual Symposium on Fundamental Cancer Research, Cancer Invasion and Metastasis: Biologic and Therapeutic Aspects, Houston,

      Metastatic squamous neck cancer with occult primary is a disease in which squamous cell cancer spreads to lymph nodes in the neck and it is not known where the cancer first formed in the body.; Signs and symptoms of metastatic squamous neck cancer with occult primary include a lump or pain in the neck or throat.; Tests that examine the tissues of the neck, respiratory tract, and upper part . Metastatic squamous neck cancer with occult primary treatment options include surgery, radiation therapy or a combination of both. Get detailed information about newly diagnosed or recurrent metastatic squamous neck cancer in this summary for clinicians.


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Occult Nodal Metastasis in Solid Carcinomata Download PDF EPUB FB2

Occult nodal metastasis in solid carcinomata. New York: Praeger, (OCoLC) Online version: International Symposium on Cellular Oncology (2nd: Palm Springs, Calif.). Occult nodal metastasis in solid carcinomata. New York: Praeger, (OCoLC) Material Type: Conference publication: Document Type: Book: All Authors.

@article{osti_, title = {Occult nodal metastasis in solid carcinomata}, author = {Moloy, P J and Nicolson, G L}, abstractNote = {This book contains 23 selections. Some of the titles are: Rationale for radiotherapy in subclinical nodal disease; rationale of chemotherapy for nodal disease: The stabilization of topoisomerase II-DNA complexes as a mechanism of antineoplastic drug action.

Results. Occult nodal metastasis was detected in 26/ (%) patients. Nodule type, tumor SUVmax, whole tumor size, solid tumor size, and preoperative serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) were identified as preoperative predictors of occult nodal metastasis (all PCited by: 6.

Clinical Radiology () 53, Solitary Cystic Nodal Metastasis From Occult Papillary Carcinoma of the Thyroid Mimicking a Branchial Cyst: a Potential Pitfall A. AHUJA, C. NG, W. KING* and C. METREWELI Departments of Diagnostic Radiology and Organ Imaging and *Surgery, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin NT, Hong Kong Thyroid carcinoma presenting as cervical lymph node metastasis Cited by:   Metastatic involvement of pelvic lymph nodes in carcinoma of the prostate alters the prognosis and treatment of this disease.

Our goal was to determine if additional techniques, such as immu-nohistochemical staining, could detect occult microscopic metastatic nodal disease not seen with routine hematoxylin and eosin by: For example, if we section lymph nodes at mm intervals and only evaluate a single section from each block, 3 possible groups of patients result from that strategy: 1) those with metastases that are larger than mm; 2) those with metastases that are smaller than mm; and 3) those with negative lymph nodes.

Prevalence of cervical node metastasis. Ten patients (30%) had metastases to the cervical nodes (recurrent or deep cervical nodes, or both).

Six patients had squamous cell carcinoma and four had adenocarcinoma. Cervical node metastasis was seen in 6 (30%) of 20 patients with lower-third tumors (4/15 adenocarcinoma and 2/5 squamous cell tumors). Methods used for the detection of occult metastases Immunohistochemistry.

Following pioneering studies at the Ludwig Institute and Royal Marsden Hospital in London, England 〚2〛, a number of groups have used immunohistochemical procedures to identify occult metastatic cancer cells in the bone marrow and lymph nodes of patients with many of the initial studies focused.

RESULTS. Occult metastases were detected in % (95% confidence interval [CI], to ) of patients. Log-rank tests indicated a significant difference between patients in whom occult metastases were detected and those in whom no occult metastases were detected with respect to overall survival (P = ), disease-free survival (P = ), and distant-disease–free interval (P =.

Summary. Detailed examinations of sentinel lymph node tissue from breast cancer patients initially classified as negative for nodal metastases revealed occult, or previously unidentified, metastases in approximately 16 percent of the samples.

Patients with these metastases had poorer overall and disease-free survival and a shorter time to distant disease diagnosis than patients without such. Occult N1 nodal metastases were present in 8 of 58 patients (14%), and these occult metastases in 7 of 8 patients (88%) occurred in peripheral stations, including interlobar, lobar, and segmental peribronchial nodes (Figure 1; Table 3).The occult disease in 5 of 8 of these patients (63%) was found in nodes identified during processing of the specimen by the pathologist.

Metastatic squamous neck cancer with occult primary is a disease in which squamous cell cancer spreads to lymph nodes in the neck and it is not known where the cancer first formed in the body.

Signs and symptoms of metastatic squamous neck cancer with occult primary include a lump or pain in the neck or throat. Occult Primary In fact, for most solid tumors that have metastasized, chemotherapy is only palliative and does not significantly improve long-term survival.

and on lymph node metastases to the neck (cervical) nodes (see here) or inguinal (groin) nodes (see. The diagnostic and therapeutic problems of cervical lymph node metastasis from an occult primary carcinoma are a dilemma for the oncologist.

In general, patients who present with metastases and no obvious primary site of origin, have a median survival of three to four months (Holmes and Fouts ; Richardson and Parker ; Smith et al. Introduction.

Invasive breast carcinoma is the most common malignancy in women and the most common solid malignancy to metastasize to the axilla since about 50% of cases present with some degree of nodal disease [1, 2].In breast carcinoma, late metastatic recurrences to the axilla have been reported, with the longest interval being up to 22 years after the original diagnosis [].

Cecile Colpaert, Peter Vermeulen, Wino Jeuris, Paul van Beest, Gerda Goovaerts, Joost Weyler, Peter Van Dam, Luc Dirix, Eric Van Marck, Early distant relapse in ‘node‐negative’ breast cancer patients is not predicted by occult axillary lymph node metastases, but by the features of the primary tumour, The Journal of Pathology, /path.

Author(s): Moloy,Peter J; Nicolson,Garth L; International Symposium on Cellular Oncology,(2nd: Palm Springs, Calif.) Title(s): Occult nodal metastasis in solid carcinomata/ Second International Symposium on Cellular Oncology ; edited by Peter J.

Moloy and Garth L. Nicolson. Regional lymph node stations were defined as per the recommendations made by Mountain and Dresler in According to our data, tumors harboring the micropapillary minor component and solid minor component had higher metastatic rates of lymph node station ( vs.

%, p = ; and vs. %, p. Results: The prevalence of cervical nodal metastasis with unknown primary site was %. We found no gender predilection in the study. Majority of the patients with occult cervical node metastases were in the third decade of life. The histological yield of pan-endoscopy biopsy.

Ellerbroek N, Holmes F, Singletary E, et al. Treatment of patients with isolated axillary nodal metastases from an occult primary carcinoma consistent with breast origin. Cancer ; Patel J, Nemoto T, Rosner D, et al. Axillary lymph node metastasis from an occult breast cancer.

The % prevalence of occult metastases in the current study is within the range reported for axillary nodes (9 to 33%) and is similar to the prevalence in our preliminary study leading to this.Background Guidelines recommend invasive mediastinal staging for centrally located tumours, even in radiological N0 nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

However, there is no uniform definition of a central tumour that is more predictive of occult mediastinal metastasis. Methods A total of consecutive patients with radiological N0 disease underwent invasive mediastinal staging.Peter J.

Moloy is the author of Cellular Oncology ( avg rating, 0 ratings, 0 reviews, published ) and Occult Nodal Metastasis in Solid Carcinomata.